The Part About Product Launches that Isn't About Launching

Hey product managers and engineers: Do your customers complain about your product releases? Does sales suck up your time trying to deal with how to explain the point of the announcement? Does customer support dread new releases? Is the marketing department failing to get you the "buzz" you know you deserve for the great new stuff you've launched? If it's yes to one or more of the above, it might be your product launch process that's broken.

When you think of product launch, what is the first thing that comes to mind?

  • What the press release will say and where you want to see coverage?
  • Updating your Facebook page?
  • Previewing your app with "influencers" who you hope will write about it?

Screen Shot 2013-03-13 at 2.22.38 PMThat's all great, but it scratches the surface of what needs to be canvassed in a well-executed product launch. The most successful launches are executed when the people in charge ensure that:

  1. The launch meets the product/feature goals of the release
  2. The company is ready to market, sell and support the release
  3. The market is properly "primed" or ready to receive the product
  4. The current customers are ready to understand and use the product.

Too often, product launches focus just on # 1 and #2 above. Product management takes item #1. Product marketing is pulled in like a tactical partner to tackle #2, viewed as the department in charge of putting a nice bow on the pretty release and generating the "buzz" about it. When that happens, service and sales tends to get sent into reactive mode, having to scramble to try to manage through #3 and #4 as best as they can.

To be successful, product launches must be planned like a symphony, with marketing, account management, and sales involved and engaged.

So, how can you best build a holistic preparedness launch process?

1. Begin at the beginning. Collaborate with product marketing at the earliest planning stage to craft a go-to-market plan, rather than waiting to do so when the release is being put into production. Incorporate the goals of the launch in that early plan -- get precise on metrics.

2. As deliverables and milestones are scheduled and tracked to completion in engineering, so should they be in marketing. In fact, in the meeting that product management and engineering decides on a go/no-go decision, marketing's progress on its plan should be a part of the evaluation criteria.

3. Work as a team. In the end, what matters most is that putting these activities together facilitates collaboration between marketing and R&D. Marketing cannot be effective without being a part of the process, especially in high tech. If you treat marketing as a facade for your product, that's probably all you're going to get.